ARTWORKS

 EUNOK HWANG  Sixty-eight years, 100x70x90cm, Mixed media, 2016  These two damaged and fragile chairs have represented the current situation between North Korea and South Korea for 68 years. Although the same blood runs in their veins, a war broke out, tearing the body of two brothers. I created the disconcerting feeling of two bodies whose blood circulation slows down, pauses, then crashes. The confrontation stops abruptly whereas a luminous heart attack occurs.     Eunok Hwang is an artist, lives and works in Paris. She obtained her PhD in Plastic Arts at Paris Sorbonne 1 University (2012), title-«Performance: Finding somewhere private in a public space». Eunok Hwang received the first prize in the 3rd competition of young creators of the 15th city hall of Paris (2006) and second prize in the 4rd Photograph Biennale of the 15th city hall of Paris (2009).  Solo Exhibition: Camera, My Artistic Body, Cheonan LIGAK Museum of ART, Korea (2014). Le Dressing, Video art IN Free ‘P’Star, Paris (2011). «Body locked out» at the CROUS gallery of Paris (2010). Group Exhibition: Zahamuseum, Your memories picture history, Seoul (2015). Sonamou « Cross direction », Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2015). « Sonamou, son.âme.où? » Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2014). Incheon Juan Media Art and Culture Festival, Incheon, Korea (2013). Sonamou, Art-Monie, gallery La Fabrique, Paris (2013). «The Flag Station», Media Art, KunstDoc Gallary, Seoul (2013). Festival Nantes, Korean history, Espace Cosmopolis, France (2013).

EUNOK HWANG

Sixty-eight years, 100x70x90cm, Mixed media, 2016

These two damaged and fragile chairs have represented the current situation between North Korea and South Korea for 68 years.
Although the same blood runs in their veins, a war broke out, tearing the body of two brothers. I created the disconcerting feeling of two bodies whose blood circulation slows down, pauses, then crashes. The confrontation stops abruptly whereas a luminous heart attack occurs.

 

Eunok Hwang is an artist, lives and works in Paris. She obtained her PhD in Plastic Arts at Paris Sorbonne 1 University (2012), title-«Performance: Finding somewhere private in a public space». Eunok Hwang received the first prize in the 3rd competition of young creators of the 15th city hall of Paris (2006) and second prize in the 4rd Photograph Biennale of the 15th city hall of Paris (2009). 
Solo Exhibition: Camera, My Artistic Body, Cheonan LIGAK Museum of ART, Korea (2014). Le Dressing, Video art IN Free ‘P’Star, Paris (2011). «Body locked out» at the CROUS gallery of Paris (2010). Group Exhibition: Zahamuseum, Your memories picture history, Seoul (2015). Sonamou « Cross direction », Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2015). « Sonamou, son.âme.où? » Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris (2014). Incheon Juan Media Art and Culture Festival, Incheon, Korea (2013). Sonamou, Art-Monie, gallery La Fabrique, Paris (2013). «The Flag Station», Media Art, KunstDoc Gallary, Seoul (2013). Festival Nantes, Korean history, Espace Cosmopolis, France (2013).

 NOA IM  The River I Must Cross II, Two-Channel Video, HD, 06:07", 2016 Borders are imaginary boundaries made real. They’re the places where the geographical boundaries between the manufactured concepts of culture, race, politics, and nations converge. In the past, these borders were far more fluid and flexible. Many were intangible, and in practice they still shift. But some of these moving lines have become fixed, nowhere moreso than in militarized control zones. The Yalu river was a natural border between China and Korea for centuries, but was once crossed freely. It’s now a place of nightmare for North Koreans leaving the country. This work plays on the modern reality of this borderland, a control zone forbidden to Koreans but a popular tourist attraction for others. Koreans can only experience this nether realm through media, acting as eyes for Koreans, always unsure if they can trust what they see. They are forced to construct their own truths and find other ways of crossing of this ancient but now forbidden border. Because we can't cross, we have to explore concepts via media and art to find truths we can build ourselves.    Noa Im was born and works in Seoul. She studied photography at the Parsons School of Design and holds an MA from London’s Chelsea College of Art and Design. She has participated a number of Seoul International Photo festivals, and is currently in the Seoul Photo Festival at the Buk Seoul Museum of Art. Her work has been shown at the Seoul Museum of Art (2012), Zaha Museum (2016), and Seoul Olympic Museum (2005). She has traveled to a number of residencies, including the Cite International des Art Paris via an award from the Samsung Foundation of Culture. 

NOA IM

The River I Must Cross II, Two-Channel Video, HD, 06:07", 2016
Borders are imaginary boundaries made real. They’re the places where the geographical boundaries between the manufactured concepts of culture, race, politics, and nations converge. In the past, these borders were far more fluid and flexible. Many were intangible, and in practice they still shift. But some of these moving lines have become fixed, nowhere moreso than in militarized control zones. The Yalu river was a natural border between China and Korea for centuries, but was once crossed freely. It’s now a place of nightmare for North Koreans leaving the country. This work plays on the modern reality of this borderland, a control zone forbidden to Koreans but a popular tourist attraction for others. Koreans can only experience this nether realm through media, acting as eyes for Koreans, always unsure if they can trust what they see. They are forced to construct their own truths and find other ways of crossing of this ancient but now forbidden border. Because we can't cross, we have to explore concepts via media and art to find truths we can build ourselves.
 

Noa Im was born and works in Seoul. She studied photography at the Parsons School of Design and holds an MA from London’s Chelsea College of Art and Design. She has participated a number of Seoul International Photo festivals, and is currently in the Seoul Photo Festival at the Buk Seoul Museum of Art. Her work has been shown at the Seoul Museum of Art (2012), Zaha Museum (2016), and Seoul Olympic Museum (2005). She has traveled to a number of residencies, including the Cite International des Art Paris via an award from the Samsung Foundation of Culture. 

 

 JEONG HAN KIM  Four Qualia Landscape Dispay: Berlin & Seoul, interactive videos (Augmented Reality), 2016.  This project has been inspired by Leonardo da Vinci’s “City of Water, Design of City as an organism.” A city is an evolving creature with a very complex system that comprises men and systems like various organizations. In the project, I look at the contemporary city in a data-flow, instead of water-flow, perspective. In the human body, afferent and efferent neural transmissions among nerves enable various organs to work as one interconnected organism. If the city is viewed as a human body, the neural transmissions can be likened to the data flow of our time. This experiment is to visualize the qualia landscape of two cities’ collective emotional networks.     Jeong Han Kim is a media artist working about ‘Emergent Mind of City’ based on convergence between Cognitive Science, Biomedical Informatics and Media Art. Nowadays, he explores the Big-data mining and visualization for ‘Collective Emotion’ of cities. Kim earned his Ph.D. study in Cognitive Science at Seoul National University and MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is an associate professor of Contemporary Art at Seoul Women’s University and a director of Seoul Women’s University Museum and B-MADE (Bio-Medical Arts & Design Education) center. He was also a Fulbright visiting scholar (2014-15) in DXARTS at University of Washington, Seattle, US. With a support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Starr fellowship from Asian Cultural Council in New York City, he participated in the artist residence program by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council in NYC. His works have been featured at the “Infosphare” at ZKM (2015-16), the 7th International Media Art Biennale Media City Seoul 2012, Whitebox at NYC and other selected group exhibitions in New York, Chicago, Madison, Toronto, Beijing, Tokyo, Mumbai, Bangkok, Seoul and so on.    

JEONG HAN KIM

Four Qualia Landscape Dispay: Berlin & Seoul, interactive videos (Augmented Reality), 2016.

This project has been inspired by Leonardo da Vinci’s “City of Water, Design of City as an organism.” A city is an evolving creature with a very complex system that comprises men and systems like various organizations. In the project, I look at the contemporary city in a data-flow, instead of water-flow, perspective. In the human body, afferent and efferent neural transmissions among nerves enable various organs to work as one interconnected organism. If the city is viewed as a human body, the neural transmissions can be likened to the data flow of our time. This experiment is to visualize the qualia landscape of two cities’ collective emotional networks.

 

Jeong Han Kim is a media artist working about ‘Emergent Mind of City’ based on convergence between Cognitive Science, Biomedical Informatics and Media Art. Nowadays, he explores the Big-data mining and visualization for ‘Collective Emotion’ of cities. Kim earned his Ph.D. study in Cognitive Science at Seoul National University and MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is an associate professor of Contemporary Art at Seoul Women’s University and a director of Seoul Women’s University Museum and B-MADE (Bio-Medical Arts & Design Education) center. He was also a Fulbright visiting scholar (2014-15) in DXARTS at University of Washington, Seattle, US. With a support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Starr fellowship from Asian Cultural Council in New York City, he participated in the artist residence program by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council in NYC. His works have been featured at the “Infosphare” at ZKM (2015-16), the 7th International Media Art Biennale Media City Seoul 2012, Whitebox at NYC and other selected group exhibitions in New York, Chicago, Madison, Toronto, Beijing, Tokyo, Mumbai, Bangkok, Seoul and so on. 

 

 

 

 SOOK JIN JO   I Have A Dream  2016 video, copies of photos, military uniform, mixed media   I have a dream. It is an ideal; some might say it is a fantasy, but I don’t think so. It is a dream and a prayer that I know will not come about in my lifetime, or my children’s–perhaps in the lives of my grandchildren’s children. I would like to think they will experience it. It is my dream that the time will come that when there is conflict, war will not be an option. We would still celebrate Memorial Day, but the uniforms that are being worn today would be in museums, and people would have grown up to understand that freedom and justice are for every person, and every person would protect that interest. We will get there when we discover that every human being is like every other human being: a special creation, a child of God.     Sook Jin Jo has exhibited internationally since 1984, and has been the subject of 30 solo exhibitions, including the Walter Gropius Master Artist Series, Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, West Virginia (2011); A Mid-Career Survey of the Work of Sook Jin Jo at the Arko Art Center, Seoul, Korea (2007) and over 100 group exhibitions, including the “Lodz Biennale”, Poland; the “Gwangju Biennale”, Korea; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Gwacheon, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; Maier Museum of Art, Virginia; the Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C.; Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Korea; and Daegu Art Museum, Korea; and Her Work is included in private and museum collections including the Seoul Museum of Art, Korea; the Erie Museum of Art, Pennsylvania; the Housatonic Museum of Art, Connecticut; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea; and The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse in Miami, Florida. Jo lives and works in New York City.

SOOK JIN JO 

I Have A Dream
2016
video, copies of photos, military uniform, mixed media

I have a dream. It is an ideal; some might say it is a fantasy, but I don’t think so. It is a dream and a prayer that I know will not come about in my lifetime, or my children’s–perhaps in the lives of my grandchildren’s children. I would like to think they will experience it. It is my dream that the time will come that when there is conflict, war will not be an option. We would still celebrate Memorial Day, but the uniforms that are being worn today would be in museums, and people would have grown up to understand that freedom and justice are for every person, and every person would protect that interest. We will get there when we discover that every human being is like every other human being: a special creation, a child of God.

 

Sook Jin Jo has exhibited internationally since 1984, and has been the subject of 30 solo exhibitions, including the Walter Gropius Master Artist Series, Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, West Virginia (2011); A Mid-Career Survey of the Work of Sook Jin Jo at the Arko Art Center, Seoul, Korea (2007) and over 100 group exhibitions, including the “Lodz Biennale”, Poland; the “Gwangju Biennale”, Korea; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Gwacheon, Korea; Seoul Museum of Art, Seoul, Korea; Maier Museum of Art, Virginia; the Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C.; Gyeonggi Museum of Modern Art, Korea; and Daegu Art Museum, Korea; and Her Work is included in private and museum collections including the Seoul Museum of Art, Korea; the Erie Museum of Art, Pennsylvania; the Housatonic Museum of Art, Connecticut; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea; and The Margulies Collection at the Warehouse in Miami, Florida. Jo lives and works in New York City.

 JAEWOOK LEE   The Geology of Morals (2016), single-channel video, 2:40", 2016   The Geology of Morals (2016) is a single-channel video which sees the Earth as a living organism that is constantly mutating and changing. The title borrows from the 3rd chapter of A Thousand Plateaus by Deleuze and Guattari. The video presents nature before the imprinting of human marks and construction of language and after. In the video, a computer-generated voice reads an excerpt from the 3rd chapter over the video footages of ices in both macroscopic and microscopic levels with a series of changing geometric shapes.      Jaewook Lee is an artist, writer, and sometime curator. Lee is the recipient of the 4th SINAP (Sindoh Artist Support Program) and 2016 SeMA Emerging Artists and Curators Supporting Program by the Seoul Museum of Art. Lee’s works have been exhibited internationally, including Asia Culture Center in Gwangju (2016), Museo Juan Manuel Blanes, Montevideo (2014), MANIFESTA 9 parallel event, Hassalt (2012), Chelsea Art Museum, New York(2011), Coreana Museum, Seoul(2006), etc. Lee is currently a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

JAEWOOK LEE

The Geology of Morals (2016), single-channel video, 2:40", 2016

The Geology of Morals (2016) is a single-channel video which sees the Earth as a living organism that is constantly mutating and changing. The title borrows from the 3rd chapter of A Thousand Plateaus by Deleuze and Guattari. The video presents nature before the imprinting of human marks and construction of language and after. In the video, a computer-generated voice reads an excerpt from the 3rd chapter over the video footages of ices in both macroscopic and microscopic levels with a series of changing geometric shapes. 

 

Jaewook Lee is an artist, writer, and sometime curator. Lee is the recipient of the 4th SINAP (Sindoh Artist Support Program) and 2016 SeMA Emerging Artists and Curators Supporting Program by the Seoul Museum of Art. Lee’s works have been exhibited internationally, including Asia Culture Center in Gwangju (2016), Museo Juan Manuel Blanes, Montevideo (2014), MANIFESTA 9 parallel event, Hassalt (2012), Chelsea Art Museum, New York(2011), Coreana Museum, Seoul(2006), etc. Lee is currently a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

 FABIAN BECHTLE  Secret.service ,  video still from "secret.service" (8:20min, 2015)  The main parts of the video "secret.service" are recorded at one of the leading European companies for data and document destruction — Reisswolf. The destruction itself is just one part of their service. In order to deal in a trustworthy way with clients’ data, the company created a high-security environment around the circle of collecting, transmitting and destroying data and documents. This closed and fully surveilled system expresses the main core of their service: trust.   Taking into consideration that the company – from a market oriented point of view – is reversing the classical production chain, one could assume that Reisswolf is producing “nothing.” (Of course, even by this reversed process, Reisswolf is still following guidelines of economy and thus keeps it running.) In this case, “nothing” is the waste of the waste – a zero point and the end of transmitting information. The video’s approach, among others, is to counter this very fact. However, if you look at cubes of shredded paper and dust pallets, you can comprehend them as sculptural works displaying encoded sensitive information. And this makes me interested in showing the potential of this specific waste by trying to re-read the shredded paper with a book scanner or remove small “letters” – let’s say “pixels” – from the huge paper blocks. At some points, the video works like an archeological window, in which “data-image-metaphors” appear. I also find the shape and the consistency of the compressed “dust-cylinders” very interesting. They remind me of a drill core. I like the idea that a geologist could actually draw conclusions from this “data-drill-core” about the origin, surrounding, history and thereby the content of the material. At the end of my video there is a sudden zoom into a big block of shredded documents. It gives the impression of a microscopic view, which is investigative and is at the same time a decay of rationality; what we see seems to be surreal and dreamlike. Here we have both mystification and demystification. At that point, we also realize that everything that happens at Reisswolf has something anachronistic. In the end, it is just a mechanical scrapping facility.     Fabian Bechtle (1980, DE) studied in Leipzig and Lyon. Based in Berlin, he worked with Armin Linke from 2009 to 2011. After that, with a DAAD grant for postgraduate artists, he moved to Belgrade for a research project where he also investigated the archives of Josip Broz Tito. Since 2015 he’s lecturer at the Academy of Fine Arts in Leipzig, Germany. His works have been shown at PACT Zollverein, Essen; Goethe-Institute, Rome; Fabricca del Vapore, Milano; Bonner Kunstverein; nGbK Berlin; Museum for Contemporary Art and Museum for Yugoslav History, Belgrade; and Trehgornaya Manufactura, Moscow.

FABIAN BECHTLE

Secret.servicevideo still from "secret.service" (8:20min, 2015)

The main parts of the video "secret.service" are recorded at one of the leading European companies for data and document destruction — Reisswolf. The destruction itself is just one part of their service. In order to deal in a trustworthy way with clients’ data, the company created a high-security environment around the circle of collecting, transmitting and destroying data and documents. This closed and fully surveilled system expresses the main core of their service: trust. 

Taking into consideration that the company – from a market oriented point of view – is reversing the classical production chain, one could assume that Reisswolf is producing “nothing.” (Of course, even by this reversed process, Reisswolf is still following guidelines of economy and thus keeps it running.) In this case, “nothing” is the waste of the waste – a zero point and the end of transmitting information. The video’s approach, among others, is to counter this very fact. However, if you look at cubes of shredded paper and dust pallets, you can comprehend them as sculptural works displaying encoded sensitive information. And this makes me interested in showing the potential of this specific waste by trying to re-read the shredded paper with a book scanner or remove small “letters” – let’s say “pixels” – from the huge paper blocks. At some points, the video works like an archeological window, in which “data-image-metaphors” appear. I also find the shape and the consistency of the compressed “dust-cylinders” very interesting. They remind me of a drill core. I like the idea that a geologist could actually draw conclusions from this “data-drill-core” about the origin, surrounding, history and thereby the content of the material. At the end of my video there is a sudden zoom into a big block of shredded documents. It gives the impression of a microscopic view, which is investigative and is at the same time a decay of rationality; what we see seems to be surreal and dreamlike. Here we have both mystification and demystification. At that point, we also realize that everything that happens at Reisswolf has something anachronistic. In the end, it is just a mechanical scrapping facility.

 

Fabian Bechtle (1980, DE) studied in Leipzig and Lyon. Based in Berlin, he worked with Armin Linke from 2009 to 2011. After that, with a DAAD grant for postgraduate artists, he moved to Belgrade for a research project where he also investigated the archives of Josip Broz Tito. Since 2015 he’s lecturer at the Academy of Fine Arts in Leipzig, Germany. His works have been shown at PACT Zollverein, Essen; Goethe-Institute, Rome; Fabricca del Vapore, Milano; Bonner Kunstverein; nGbK Berlin; Museum for Contemporary Art and Museum for Yugoslav History, Belgrade; and Trehgornaya Manufactura, Moscow.

 KONRAD MÜHE  AVALANCHE , 2013, glass, projector, Video: 3 min, loop  In Avalanche, a body is carried by a stream of water like a piece of driftwood. Even when encountering obstacles in the riverbed such as rocks, it stoically remains in position: arms at its torso and legs shut. Four variations of similar situations in which the figure appears and vanishes from the vertically-cropped frame are projected onto a cube of stacked glass sheets. Like a series of physical tests, we observe a body under the influence of exterior conditions.     Konrad Mühe (1982, former GDR) studied in Halle( Saale) and Berlin is an artist living in Berlin. He won several grants and prizes for his works for example the Karl-Schmidt Rottluff grant in 2014 and a research grant by the Berlin Senate in 2016. His works have been shown at Bundekunsthalle Bonn, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Museum of Modern Art Moscow, Berlinische Galerie, among others. His films have been included in several international film festivals, for example at CPH:DOX, Berlinale, Oberhausen and BIEFF Romania.

KONRAD MÜHE

AVALANCHE , 2013, glass, projector, Video: 3 min, loop

In Avalanche, a body is carried by a stream of water like a piece of driftwood. Even when encountering obstacles in the riverbed such as rocks, it stoically remains in position: arms at its torso and legs shut. Four variations of similar situations in which the figure appears and vanishes from the vertically-cropped frame are projected onto a cube of stacked glass sheets. Like a series of physical tests, we observe a body under the influence of exterior conditions.

 

Konrad Mühe (1982, former GDR) studied in Halle( Saale) and Berlin is an artist living in Berlin. He won several grants and prizes for his works for example the Karl-Schmidt Rottluff grant in 2014 and a research grant by the Berlin Senate in 2016. His works have been shown at Bundekunsthalle Bonn, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Museum of Modern Art Moscow, Berlinische Galerie, among others. His films have been included in several international film festivals, for example at CPH:DOX, Berlinale, Oberhausen and BIEFF Romania.